Living with wildfire: A story of reconstruction and resiliency at Rancho Mariposa

For the Monroes and countless other families living in California’s ever-widening fire zones, the question is not whether they’ll stay, but how.
A man looks out from sliding doors.
Kim Monroe (pictured) and his wife Mary are the first to rebuild their home on Rancho Mariposa after losing it in the 2017 fire.(Ryder Kimball/Peninsula Press)

Climate change is altering the physical and social landscapes of California. It’s making the state’s wildfire season more intense, longer, and more damaging. Within this destruction many residents are exploring new ways to adapt to what’s become a new normal. They’re reevaluating their relationship to the land, fortifying their homes, and are building more resilient communities. Four years after the Redwood Valley Fire devastated their family ranch, the Monroes reflect on their heritage in Mendocino County and begin to rebuild. Read more about their story here.

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