Environment

Oil Drilling on California’s Federal Lands Set to Resume After 8 Years, Sets up Early Test of Biden Administration

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FELLOWS, Ca.— When the sun rose on the morning of Nov. 13, a procession of pumpjacks cast long shadows across golden hills. A lonely cow spent the night ten yards away but now stood backlit by the smog-filtered sun on the horizon. Exactly 11 months earlier, the Trump administration had gone ahead with plans to approve new oil drilling leases on public lands in California. The decision opened more than 1.5 million acres to drilling and ended an eight-year moratorium on federal land leasing in the state. The first seven parcels, 35 miles outside Bakersfield total 4,333.58 acres and are slated to go on sale Dec. 10. More than 90,000…

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Advice from a legendary wildlife photographer: Amos Nachoum

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Amos Nachoum’s office space looks different than most: it’s underwater in the ocean, and occasionally the wilderness. For the past three decades, the 70-year-old Israeli has been pushing the boundaries of wildlife photography. There is no right way to become a world-renowned wildlife photographer – Nachoum took up stints as a war photographer in Israel and a cab driver in New York City in his early career. However, success in the field often hinges upon grit, creativity, and a willingness to learn. One of Nachoum’s most famous undertakings is photographing swimming polar bears. In fact, there was a documentary all about it, Picture of His Life. You can watch the…

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Bay Area kid activists are prioritizing climate protests over school plays to save their future

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BAY AREA — There is a growing crowd of Bay Area youth climate activists. Youth leaders were some of the critical organizers of the local September climate week, where 40,000 people were out in the streets of San Francisco, a portion of the estimated 7.6 million who struck globally in support of more governmental action to prevent climate change.

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Bay Area restaurants tally losses from spoiled food, lost sales from power shutoffs

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Pacific Gas and Electric’s late October power shutoffs impacted numerous restaurants in the Bay Area. Restaurants lost food and customers. Picco Restaurant & Pizzeria, a restaurant specialized in California-influenced Neapolitan pizzas in Larkspur, had to close their restaurant Oct. 26 at 2:30 p.m. and reopened on Oct. 29. It estimates its losses at $43,000. The shutdown caused the restaurant to lose six meal periods, said Ryan Heis, Picco’s managing partner. The restaurant had to throw out some of its food and beverages. Some of these included stocks, sauces and open bottles of wine served by the glass.  “We lost a lot, we lost a good Saturday night business,” said Lauren…

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